Immunisations

Childhood Immunisations

If a vaccine is given when a baby still has antibodies to the disease, the antibodies can stop the vaccine working. This is why routine childhood immunisations do not start until a baby is two months old, before the antibodies a baby gets from its mother have stopped working. This is also why it is important for parents to stick to the immunisation schedule, as a delay can leave a baby unprotected. A delay can increase the chance of adverse reactions to some vaccines, such as pertussis (whooping cough).

child immunisations

Vaccination Schedule

Age dueVaccine given
Eight weeks oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and hepatitis B (DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB)
Meningococcal B (MenB) Rotavirus
Twelve weeks oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio
Hib and hepatitis B (DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB)
Rotavirus
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13)
Sixteen weeks oldDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio
Hib and hepatitis B (DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB)
Meningococcal B (MenB)
One year old (on or after the child’s first birthday)Hib/MenC
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) Meningococcal B (MenB) Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
Three years four months old or soon afterDiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (dTaP/IPV) Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)